8 Bow Hunting Tips That Will Yield A Full Freezer

When it comes to bow hunting, now more popular than ever before, enjoying one successful season is no guarantee that the following year will yield the same favorable results.  To raise the odds, hunters can raise the bar when it comes to preparing for the coming hunts.  Consider the 8 bow hunting tips below to increases the chances that the season ahead will end with a full freezer of positive results. bow hunting deer 1.  Improve your archery form.  As the experts at Field and Stream point out, a draw length that is too long, a locked left arm when shooting or an improper grip are all too common among unpracticed bow hunters.  Visiting a range with a more skilled shooter who is willing to share honest feedback can make all the difference when working toward better form.

2.  Take advantage of technology to preview your hunting grounds.  Never before has it been more convenient than it is today to scout hunting grounds in advance.  With tools such as Google Earth at one’s fingertips, it is possible not only to pre-select spots to put up a tree stand but also to zoom in to an image so detailed that it is sometimes even possible to see deer trails on the screen.

3.  Study your prey.  Whether learning from other successful hunters or researching whitetail deer by scouring library books, learning more about the behavior and instincts of the animal that you are targeting will put you in an advantageous position when it comes to bringing home the prize.

4.  Look to a more effective attractant.  When it comes to attracting deer, veteran hunters interviewed by Outdoor Life agree that using tarsal glands is the way to go.  Bow hunters in the know see more results with this attractant than with any alternative.

5.  Try more realistic practice scenarios.  Using a 3D course to brush up and exercise outside of hunting season provide an excellent opportunity to brush up on shooting skills by revealing the ways that incline and decline shots cause an arrow to go off course as well as providing practice estimating distance.

6.  Do not procrastinate scouting spots.  When possible, scout spots well before the week prior to the start of the hunting season. Crowds of hunters converging on hunting grounds at the last-minute put deer on alert and in doing so help no one’s chances of success.  Instead, begin glassing fields and setting up perimeter trail cams as early as August.  Once you spot deer, put up your tree stand and move the cams there.  Pick up the camera cards prior to the start of the season for pictures that will tell a story of exactly where to hunt.  Better yet? Connect with a landowner through a service such as LandToHunt to reduce the likelihood that dozens of other hunters will be scouting the land and stirring up the deer before the season begins.

7.  Let the wind be your guide.  All of the advance scouting and practice shooting in the world will still not yield ideal results if you are hunting with bad winds.  Animals have millions of scent receptors. Hunting in the wrong wind will not prove fruitful.  Be sure to plan accordingly.

8.  Hunt during midday, rather than the morning or afternoon. Hunting in midday has yielded some big prizes for bow hunters. While some believe that this is because deer have become attuned to the fact that hunters tend to be out in the mornings and afternoons, there is not a consensus on the reason, with others holding the belief that deer become active at midday because that is when they wake up and eat after a long active night.  Rather than leaving your tree stand by mid-morning, try staying through the late morning until 2:00 PM, especially during the rut, and increase your chances of scoring a trophy that would otherwise have gone missed.

Implementing the tips above when preparing for and embarking on the next season should prove fruitful for any bow hunter looking to improve his or her yield.  

 

Related:  5 Proven Strategies for Late-Summer Scouting

Source: LandToHunt Blog

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